Really the theatre seemed to take itself very seriously

Theater and Performances
Below is an index of productions (stage, radio, and television) of Beckett's plays, in alphabetical order by English title. Naturally, this is not a complete index though it has bold aspirations in that direction, and to this end news of any productions not listed here, as well as corrections and amendments to what is listed, are definitely welcome. This is only the beginning. Please e-mail us with any comments or questions!

Act Without Words I

• first performed (with Fin de partie) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on April 3, 1957. Directed by and featured Deryk Mendel.

• performed as part of the XVII International Theatre Festival, La Biennale di Venezuela, at the Teatro del Ridotto, July 3, 1958. Directed by and featured Deryk Mendel.

• performed (with Spiel) at the Ulmer Theater, Ulm-Donau, on June 14, 1963. Directed by and featured Deryk Mendel.

Act Without Words II

• performed (with Spiel) at the Ulmer Theater, Ulm-Donau, on June 14, 1963. Directed by and featured Deryk Mendel.

• broadcast on Channel 5 (television), New York, on February 17, 1965. Directed by Alan Schneider.

All That Fall

• first broadcast on BBC Third Programme on January 13, 1957. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Jack MacGowran, Patrick Magee, Mary Farell, James Gerard Devlin, Allan McClelland, Harry Hutchinson.

• broadcast (as Tous ceux qui tombent) on RTF/ORTF, Paris, on February 25, 1963. Directed by Michel Mitrani. Featured Alice Sapricht, Guy Tréjean, Christian Marin, Pierre Palau, Hubert Deschamps.

• "modernized version" broadcast on June 4, 1972. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Marie Kean, J. G. Devlin, Alan McClelland.

Breath

• opened as prologue to Kenneth Tynan's revue, Oh! Calcutta! at the Eden Theater, New York, on June 16, 1969.

• opened at the Close Theatre Club, Glasgow, in October 1969.

...but the clouds...

• first televised on BBC2 on April 17, 1977.

Catastrophe

• opened (with Berceuse and L'Impromptu d'Ohio) at the Théâtre du Rond-Point, Paris, on September 15, 1983. Directed by Michael Lonsdale. Featured Michael Lonsdale, Catherine Sellers, Jean-Louis Barrault, Dominique Ehlinger.

• opened (as Katastrophe, with Was Wo) at Theater im Malersaal, Graz, on September 23, 1983. Directed by Kurt Josef Schildknecht. German translation by Elmer Tophoven. Featured Walter Kohls, Petra Fahrnlander, Alexander Holler, and Peter Hegelmann.

• opened at the Edinburgh Festival of Music and Drama on August 13, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Donald Davis, Leigh Taylor-Young, David Warrilow, and Rand Mitchell.

• opened at Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin, in 1999.

Come and Go

• opened (with Le Dépeupleur) at the Théâtre du Rond-Point on October 6, 1981. Directed by Lee Breuer. Featured JoAnne Akalaitis, Ruth Maleczech, and Ellen McElduff.

Eh Joe

• first broadcast by BBC2 on July 4, 1966. Directed by Alan Gibson and Beckett (uncredited). Featured Jack MacGowran and Siân Phillips.

• broadcast on German television (as He Joe) at Süddeutscher Rundfunk, Stuttgart, on July 13, 1966. Directed by Beckett. Featured Deryk Mendel and Nancy Illig.

• opened (as Dis Joe) at the Centre Georges Pompidou on October 21, 1981. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured David Warrilow.

Embers

• first broadcast on the BBC’s Third Programme, June 24, 1959. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Jack MacGowran, Kathleen Michael, Kethleen Helme, and Patrick Magee.

Endgame

• first performed (as Fin de partie) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on April 3, 1957. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Roger Blin, Jean Martin, Georges Adet, Christine Tsingos.

• opened (as Endspiel) at the Schlosspark, Berlin, on September 30, 1957. Directed by Hans Bauer. Featured Bernhard Minetti, Rudi Schmitt, Werner Stock, and Else Ehser.

• opened at the Cherry Lane Theatre, New York, on January 28, 1958. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Lester Rawlins, Alvin Epstein, P. J. Kelly, Nydia Westman.

• opened (as Endspiel) on March 8, 1958. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured George Bucher, Karl Schellenberg, Franz Ibaschitz, Mela Wigandt.

• performed as part of the "Holland Festival 1958" (as Fin de partie) at the Rotterdamse Schouwburg, Rotterdam, on June 21; the Schevingen Kurhauscabaret on June 22; and the Nieuwe de la Martheater, Amsterdam, on June 24. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Roger Blin, Jean Martin, Georges Adet, Alice Reichen.

• opened at the Cherry Lane Theatre, New York, on February 11, 1962. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Vincent Gardenia, Ben Piazza, John C. Becher, Sudie Bond.

• opened (as Fin de partie) at the Théâtre de Carouge, Geneva, on May 15, 1962. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Roger Blin, Maurice Aufair, Marc Fayolle, Valerie Quincy.

• opened at the Studio Champs-Elysées, Paris, on February 20, 1964. Directed by Michael Blake, assisted by Beckett. Featured Patrick Magee, Jack MacGowran, Sydney Bromley, and Elvi Hale.

• opened at the Aldwych Theatre, London, on July 9, 1964. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Patrick Magee, Jack MacGowran, Brian Pringle, and Patsy Byrne.

• opened (as Endspiel) at the Schiller-Theater Werkstatt on September 25, 1967. Directed by Beckett. Featured Ernst Schröder, Horst Bollman, Werner Stock, Gudrun Genest.

• opened (as Fin de partie) at the Théâtre 347, Paris, in 1968. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Roger Blin, Jean Martin (replaced by André Julien), Georges Adet, and Christine Tsingos.

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on October 28, 1968. Directed by George Devine. Featured George Devine, Jack MacGowran, Richard Goolden, Frances Cuka.

• opened at the Washington Square Methodist Church on May 30, 1970. Directed by Robert Sklar. Featured Joseph Chaikin, Peter Maloney, James Barbosa, and Jayne Haynes.

• opened at New York University School of the Arts on February 8, 1973. Directed by André Gregory. Featured Gerry Bammam, Larry Pine, Tom Costello, Saskia Noordhoek Hegt. This infamous production featured a wild array of sound effects (bugles, machine guns, crowing roosters, automobiles) and quickly won disapproval from critics and Beckett.

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, as part of the Samuel Beckett Festival, on May 20, 1976. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Patrick Magee, Stephen Rea, Leslie Sarony, Rose Hill.

• opened at Roundabout Stage Two, New York, on March 27, 1977. Directed by Gene Feist. Featured Gordon Heath, Jake Dengel, Charles Randall, Suzanne Shepherd.

• opened at the Murray Theater, Princeton, on May 4, 1977. Directed by Joseph Chaikin. Featured Daniel Seltzer, Christopher McCann, Charles Stanley, Shami Chaikin.

• opened (as Slutparti) at Bristol Music Centers Teater, Copenhagen, on September 18, 1978. Directed by Walter D. Asmus. Featured Morten Grunwald, Ove Sprogoe, Tommy Kenter, and Lily Weiding.

• opened at the Young Vic, London, on January 29, 1980.

• opened (as Fin de partie) at the American Center on October 26, 1981. Directed by Sandra Solov. Featured Pierre Chabert, Henry Pillsbury, Raymond Segre, and Sandra Solov.

• opened at Tai Théâtre d’Essai on April 13, 1983. Directed by Peter Hudson. Featured Nick Calderbank, Christian Erikson, Robert Barr, and Judith Burnett.

• opened at the Bathhouse Theater, Seattle, in 1998.

• a bilingual version of Endgame/Fin de partie opened in Montreal in 1999. The performance took place in an abandoned warehouse in subzero temperatures.

• opened at Harbourfront's Premiere Dance Theatre, Toronto, in 1999. Directed by Daniel Brooks. Featured Diego Matamoros, Peter Donat, Jim Warren, and Karen Robinson.

• opened at the Winters Opera House, Winters, California, on May 21, 1999. Directed by Lloyd Vance.

• opened at St. Margaret's Anglican Church, Winnipeg, Manitoba, on January 11, 2001.

• opened at the Earl Street Theatre, Kingston, Ontario, on February 22, 2001. Directed by Mark Ingram. Featured Steven Spencer, Clayton Garrett, Aaron Miedema, and Linda Worsley.

Enough

• opened (with Rockababy) at the Center for Theatre Research, State University of New York, Buffalo, on April 8, 1981. Directed by Alan Schneider.

• opened (with Footfalls and Rockaby) at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, New York, on February 16, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Billie Whitelaw.

Footfalls

• premiered (with Play and That Time) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, as part of the Samuel Beckett Festival, on May 20, 1976. Directed by Beckett. Featured Billie Whitelaw and Rose Hill.

• opened (with That Time and Play) at the Manhattan Theatre Club, New York, on December 18, 1977. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Sloane Shelton and Suzanne Costallos

• opened (as Pas, with Pas moi) at the Théâtre d’Orsay Grane salle, Paris, on April 11, 1978. Directed by Beckett. Featured Delphine Seyrig and Madeleine Renaud.

• opened as part of the Samuel Beckett Symposium and 75th birthday celebrations at Ohio State University on May 9, 1981. Featured Rosemary Pountney.

• opened (with Rockaby and Ohio Impromptu as part of "Three By Beckett") at Los Angeles Actors’ Theatre on February 23, 1982. Directed by Alan Mandell.

• opened (with Rockaby and Enough) at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, New York, on February 16, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Billie Whitelaw and Sybil Lines.

Ghost Trio

• first broadcast on BBC2 television on April 17, 1977.

Happy Days

• premiered at the Cherry Lane Theatre, New York, on September 17, 1961. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Ruth White and John C. Becher.

• opened (as Glückliche Tage) at the Schiller-Theater Werkstatt, Cologne, on November 5, 1961. Directed by Walter Henn. Featured Berta Drews and Rudolf Fernau.

• opened (as Glückliche Tage) at the Schausspielhaus "Tribune", Düsseldorf, on December 17, 1961. Directed by Karl Henry Stroux. Featured Maria Wimmer.

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on November 1, 1962. Directed by George Devine. Featured Brenda Bruce and Peter Duguid.

• opened (as Oh les beaux jours) at the Teatro del Ridotto, Venice, on September 28, 1963.

• opened at the Eblana Theatre, Dublin, on September 30, 1963. Directed by John Beary. Featured Marie Kean and O. Z. Whitehead.

• opened (as Oh les beaux jours) at the Odéon-Théâtre de France, Paris, on October 21, 1963. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Madeleine Renaud and Jean-Louis Barrault.

• opened (as Oh les beaux jours) at the Théâtre de France on September 14, 1964.

• opened (as Giorno felici) at the Teatro Gobetti, Turin, on April 2, 1965. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Laura Adani and Franco Passatore.

• opened at the Cherry Lane Theatre, New York, on September 14, 1965. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Madeleine Renaud and Jean-Louis Barrault.

• opened (as Giorno felici) at the Teatro Gerolamo, Milan, on September 18, 1965. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Laura Adani and Franco Passatore.

• opened the Studio Arena Theatre, Buffalo, New York, on October 12, 1968. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Sada Thompson and Wyman Pendleton.

• opened (as Glückliche Tage, translated by Erika and Elmar Tophoven) at the Schiller-Theater Werkstatt, Berlin, on September 17, 1971. Directed by Beckett. Featured Eva-Katharina Schultz and Rudi Schmitt.

• opened at the Liverpool Playhouse, Liverpool, on November 26, 1975. Later transferred to the Old Vic Theatre and then to the Lyttleton Theatre, London. Directed by Sir Peter Hall. Featured Dame Peggy Ashcroft and Alan Webb (sometimes Harry Lomax).

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on June 7, 1979. Dircted by Beckett. Featured Billie Whitelaw and Leonard Fenton.

• opened at the New York Shakespeare Festival on June 7, 1979. Dircted by Andrei Serban. Featured Irene Worth and George Voskovec.

• broadcast on BBC2 television on October 13, 1979. Directed by Beckett and Tristram Powell. This was a film of the Royal Court Theatre production of June 7.

• opened (as Oh les beaux jours) at the Théâtre du Rond-Point on September 29, 1981. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Madeleine Renaud and Gerard Lorin.

Krapp’s Last Tape

• first performed (with Endgame) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on October 28, 1958. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Patrick McGee.

• opened at the Provincetown Playhouse, New York, on January 14, 1960. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Donald Davis.

• opened at the East End Theatre, New York, on September 12, 1961. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Donald Davis.

• opened at the Cherry Lane Theatre, New York, on June 8, 1965. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured George Bartenief.

• opened (as Das Letzte Band) at the Schiller-Theater Werkstatt, Berlin, on October 5, 1969. Directed by Beckett. Featured Martin Held.

• broadcast on BBC2 on November 29, 1972. Directed by Donald McWhinnie, from an amended script by Beckett. Featured Pat Magee.

• opened at the Vivian Beaumont Theater, Lincoln Center, New York, in November 1972. Featured Hume Cronyn.

• opened (as La Dernière Bande) at the Théâtre d’Orsay, Paris, on April 8, 1975. Directed by Beckett. Featured Pierre Chabert.

• opened (with Endgame) at the "Beckett Directs Beckett" performance at the Goodman Studio Theater, Chicago, on September 25, 1980. Beckett’s direction was assisted by Gregory Mosher. [Same cast as in London and Dublin.]

• opened at the Centre Georges Pompidou on October 5, 1981. Directed by Beckett. Featured Rick Cluchey.

• opened at The Citizen Theatre, Glasgow, on February 11, 1998.

• opened on September 5, 1998, at the St. Ambrose Arts Center, West Hollywood. Performed and directed by Rick Cluchey.

• opened at the Mary-Archie Theatre, Chicago, in 1998. Directed by Scott Baker. Featured Turk Muller.

• opened in Weaverville, California, on August 20, 1999.

The Lost Ones

• opened (as Le Dépeupleur, with Come and Go) at the Théâtre du Rond-Point on October 6, 1981. Directed by Lee Breuer. Featured David Warrilow.

Not I

• premiered at the Forum Theater of the Lincoln Center, New York, in September 1972.

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on January 16, 1973.

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on January 29, 1975. Directed by Anthony Page. Featured Billie Whitelaw and Melvyn Hastings.

• opened (as Pas moi) at the Théâtre d’Orsay, Paris, on April 5, 1975. Directed by Beckett. Featured Madeleine Renaud.

• opened (as Pas moi, with Pas) at the Théâtre d’Orsay Grane salle, Paris, on April 11, 1978. Directed by Beckett. Featured Madeleine Renaud.

Ohio Impromptu

• premiered as part of the Samuel Beckett Symposium and 75th birthday celebrations at Ohio State University on May 9, 1981. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured David Warrilow and Rand Mitchell.

• opened (with Rockaby) at the Centre Georges Pompidou on October 14, 1981. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured David Warrilow and Rand Mitchell.

• opened (with Rockaby and Footfalls as part of "Three By Beckett") at Los Angeles Actors’ Theatre on February 23, 1982. Directed by Alan Mandell.

• opened (as L’Impromptu d’Ohio, with Berceuse and Catastrophe) at the Théâtre du Rond-Point, Paris, on September 15, 1983. Directed by Pierre Chabert. Featured Michael Lonsdale and Jean-Louis Barrault.

• opened at the Edinburgh Festival of Music and Drama on August 13, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured David Warrilow and Rand Mitchell.

Play

• opened (as Spiel) at the Ulmer Theater, Ulm-Donau, on June 14, 1963. Directed by Deryk Mendel. Featured Nancy Illig, Sigrid Pfeiffer, and Gerhard Winter.

• opened (as Spiel) at the Schiller-Theater Werkstatt, Berlin, on November 16, 1963. Directed by Deryk Mendel. Featured Nancy Illig, Sigrid Pfeiffer, and Gerhard Winter.

• opened at the Old Vic Theatre, London, on April 7, 1964. Directed by George Devine. Featured Rosemary Harris, Billie Whitelaw, and Robert Stephens.

• opened (as Comédie) at the Pavillon de Marson, Paris, on June 11, 1964. Directed by Jean-Marie Serreau, assisted by Beckett. Featured Eléonore Hirt, Delphine Seyrig, and Michael Lonsdale.

• opened (as Comédie) at the Théâtre Poche-Montparnasse, Paris, on March 21, 1969. Directed by Jean-Marie Serreau. Featured Toto Bissanthe, Danielle van Bercheyke, and Michael Lonsdale.

• opened at the Yale Repertory Theatre on April 1, 1971. Directed by Tom Haas. Featured Sarah Albertson, Elizabeth Parrish, David Ackroyd.

• opened (with That Time and Footfalls) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, as part of the Samuel Beckett Festival, on May 20, 1976. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Anna Massey, Penelope Wilton, Ronald Pickup.

• opened (with That Time and Footfalls) at the Manhattan Theatre Club, New York, on December 18, 1977. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Sloane Shelton, Suzanne Costallos, and Donald Davis.

• opened at the University of Winnipeg, Manitoba, on January 12, 2001.

Rockaby

• opened (with Enough) at the Center for Theatre Research, State University of New York, Buffalo, on April 8, 1981. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Billie Whitelaw.

• opened (with Ohio Impromptu) at the Centre Georges Pompidou on October 14, 1981. Directed by David Warrilow. Featured Helen G. Bishop.

• opened (with Footfalls and Ohio Impromptu as part of "Three By Beckett") at Los Angeles Actors’ Theatre on February 23, 1982. Directed by Alan Mandell.

• opened at the National Theatre, Cottesloe Theatre, London, on December 9, 1982. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Billie Whitelaw, who also gave a reading of Enough.

• opened (as Berceuse, with Catastrophe and L’Impromptu d’Ohio) at the Théâtre du Rond-Point, Paris, on September 15, 1983. Directed by Pierre Chabert. Featured Catherine Sellers.

• opened (with Footfalls and Enough) at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, New York, on February 16, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Billie Whitelaw.

• opened (with Waiting For Godot) at the Victory Gardens Theater, Chicago, on September 20, 1998.

That Time

• premiered (with Play and Footfalls) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, as part of the Samuel Beckett Festival, on May 20, 1976. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Patrick Magee.

• opened (with Play and Footfalls) at the Manhattan Theatre Club, New York, on December 18, 1977. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Donald Davis.

• opened at the Edinburgh Festival of Music and Drama on August 13, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider.

Waiting for Godot

• first performed (as En attendant Godot) at the Théâtre de Babylone, Paris, in 1952. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Pierre Latour, Lucien Raimbourg, Roger Blin, Jean Martin, and Serge Lecointe.

• opened at the Coconut Grove Playhouse, Coral Gables, Florida, on January 3, 1956. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Bert Lahr, Tom Ewell, Arthur Malet, Jack Scott Smart, and Jimmy Oster. Ludicrously billed as "the Laugh Sensation of two Continents", this production had numerous walk-outs and was filleted by local reviewers. The show was closed after two weeks. Beckett confided to Schneider, "Of course I know the Miami swells and their live models can hardly be described as theatre-goers and that their reactions are no more significant than those of a Jersey herd and I presume their critics are worthy of them."

• opened at Ethel Barrymore Theatre, January 21-26, 1957. Directed by Herbert Berghof. Featured Manton Moreland, Earle Hyman, Geoffrey Holder, Rex Ingram, and Bert Chamberlain. The first all-black production of the play.

• opened at San Quentin State Prison, on November 19, 1957. Directed by Herbert Blau. Featured Jules Irving. The play, chosen because its cast was entirely male, greatly impressed the inmates who, unlike the "Miami swells," understood a thing or two about the idea of waiting. The formation of the San Quentin Drama Workshop was a result of the production’s success.

• opened at the Alley Theatre, Houston, on September 9, 1958. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Sidney Kay, John Astin, John Wylie, Carl Bensen, and Neil Tucker.

• opened at the Royal Stratford E., London, on May 15, 1961. Directed by Alan Simpson. Featured Brian Phelan, David Kelly, Derek Young, Nigel Fitzgerald, and Patrick Byrne.

• BBC1 television broadcast on June 22, 1961. Directed by Donald McWhinnie. Featured Peter Woodthorpe, Jack MacGowran, Timothy Bateson, Felix Felton, and Mark Mileham.

• opened at the Encore Theater, San Francisco, on June 21, 1962. Directed by Herbert Blau. Featured Robert Symonds, Eugene Roche, Alan Mandell, Edward Winter, and Christopher Bergman.

• opened at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on December 30, 1964. Directed by Anthony Page, assisted by Beckett. Featured Alfred Lynch, Nicol Williamson, Jack MacGowran, Paul Curran, Kirk Martin.

• opened at the Schiller-Theater Werkstatt, Berlin, on February 25, 1965. Directed by Deryk Mendel, assisted by Beckett. Featured Stefan Wigger, Horst Bollmann, Klaus Herm, Bernhard Minetti, Gerhard Sprunkel. Beckett thought this show "mediocre" and that Minetti "gave the worst performance as Pozzo I have ever seen."

• opened at the Avon Theatre, Stratford, Ontario, on August 22, 1968. Directed by William Hutt. Featured Eric Donkin, Powys Thomas, Adrian Pecknold, James Blendick, and Douglas Birkenshaw.

• opened (as En attendant Godot) at the Théâtre de Plaisance, Paris, on April 3, 1974. Directed by Thierry Destraz. Featured Jacques Salmon, Thierry Destraz, Jean Chevrin, Jacques Desmoliers, and Michel Estève. Beckett considered this revival "very poor" and the troupe "very young."

• opened (as Warten auf Godot) at the Schiller-Theater on March 8, 1975. Directed by Beckett. Featured Horst Bollmann, Stefan Wigger, Klaus Herm, Martin Held (replaced by Karl Raddatz), and Torsten Sense.

• opened at Stanford University, California, on August 12, 1975.

• opened (as Warten auf Godot) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on April 21, 1976. Directed by Beckett. Same cast as March 8, 1975.

• opened at the Los Angeles Actors’ Theatre in 1977. Directed by Ralph Waite. Featured Donald Moffat, Dana Elcar, Bruce French, Ralph Waite, and Rico Williams.

• opened (as En attendant Godot) at the Odéon-Théâtre de France on February 21, 1978. Directed by Roger Blin. Featured Jean-Paul Rousillin, Michel Aumont, Georges Riquier, Francois Chaumette.

• opened at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York, on May 25, 1978. Directed by Walter D. Asmus. Featured Austin Pendleton, Sam Waterston, Milo O’Shea, Michael Egan, and R. J. Murray.

• opened (as En attendant Godot) at la Cour d’Honneur du Palais des Papes on July 16, 1978. Directed by Otomar Krejca and Yves Cassagne. Featured Rufus, Georges Wilson, Jose-Maria Flotas, Michel Bouquet, and Fabrice Luchini.

• opened at The Acting Company, Public Theatre, New York, on April 22, 1981. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Richard S. Iglewski, Richard Howard, Paul Walker, Keith David, and Johann Carlo.

• opened (with Rockaby) at the Victory Gardens Theater, Chicago, on September 20, 1998.

• opened at the River Stage in Sacramento, California, on July 10, 1999. Directed by Frank Condon.

• opened at the Odeon Theatre de l'Europe, Paris, on September 16, 1999. Directed by Luc Bondy. Featured Francois Chattot, Gerard Desarthe, Roger Jendly, Serge Merlin, and Xavier Loria.

• opened at the Bruka Theatre, Reno, Nevada, on November 19, 1999. Directed by Dave Anderson

What Where

• opened (as Was Wo, with Katastrophe) at Theater im Malersaal, Graz, on September 23, 1983. Directed by Kurt Josef Schildknecht. German translation by Elmer Tophoven. Featured Rainer Hauer, Armin J. Schallock, Horst Klaus, and Dietrich Schloderer.

• opened at the Edinburgh Festival of Music and Drama on August 13, 1984. Directed by Alan Schneider. Featured Donald Davis, David Warrilow, Rand Mitchell, and Daniel Wirth.

Words and Music

• first broadcast on the BBC Third Programme on November 13, 1962. Directed by Michael Bakewell. Featured Felix Fenton and Patrick Magee. Music by John Beckett.


Tim Conley
& A. Ruch
22 October 2001